“‘We Couldn’t Believe Our Eyes’: A Lost World of Shipwrecks Is Found” – The New York Times

This is really exciting!

“Archaeologists have found more than 40 vessels in the Black Sea, some more than a millennium old, shedding light on early empires and trade routes.”

Source: ‘We Couldn’t Believe Our Eyes’: A Lost World of Shipwrecks Is Found – The New York Times

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“The Frenzy About High-Tech Talent by Andrew Hacker” | The New York Review of Books

In reviewing several books on the STEM craze, Andrew Hacker questions the underlying assumptions driving this fad. Such an evaluation is long overdue. I’m a fan of STEM, but I’ve been concerned for a long time about the adverse effects of putting these fields on a pedestal to the detriment of other areas of study. There are many reasons to question the STEM fad, but one of the most immediate concerns is the assumption that there will be jobs for students that go into those fields. Based on several studies, Hacker argues that there is little evidence to support this assumption.

Hacker concludes that “[t]he fervor over STEM goes beyond promoting a quartet of academic subjects. Rather, it’s about the kind of nation and people we are to be. Already in play are efforts to instill the metrics—and morality—of technology within ourselves as individuals and into the texture of society. Artists and poets may have to score high on tests of trinomial distributions if they want bachelors’ degrees. In viewing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as strategic weapons, we are constricting honored callings and narrowing national priorities, while the alleged needs for STEM workers are open to serious question, including whether the demand for them may be exaggerated and manipulated.”

Read the entire article here:

The Frenzy About High-Tech Talent by Andrew Hacker | The New York Review of Books.

engineering

“Oldest known stone tools found in Kenya; makers not known” – Yahoo News

Check this out! Scientists have found stone tools far older than any known stone tool. ” At 3.3 million years old, they push back the record of stone tools by about 700,000 years. More significantly, they are half-a-million years older than any known trace of our own branch of the evolutionary tree.” Read the entire article here:

Oldest known stone tools found in Kenya; makers not known – Yahoo News.

"In this undated photo made available in May 2015 by the Mission Prehistorique au Kenya - West Turkana Archaeological Project, Sonia Harmand and Jason Lewis hold stone tools found in the West Turkana area of Kenya. The artifacts, dated at 3.3 million years old, are much older than the earliest known trace of our own branch of the evolutionary family tree. So it’s a new challenge to the traditional idea that only members of our branch made stone tools. The discovery was reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday, May 20, 2015. (MPK-WTAP via AP)"

“In this undated photo made available in May 2015 by the Mission Prehistorique au Kenya – West Turkana Archaeological Project, Sonia Harmand and Jason Lewis hold stone tools found in the West Turkana area of Kenya. The artifacts, dated at 3.3 million years old, are much older than the earliest known trace of our own branch of the evolutionary family tree. So it’s a new challenge to the traditional idea that only members of our branch made stone tools. The discovery was reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday, May 20, 2015. (MPK-WTAP via AP)”