“Legends say China began in a great flood. Scientists just found evidence that the flood was real.” – The Washington Post

“Chinese geologists uncovered evidence of a catastrophic flood some 4000 years ago — right around the time that legends say a mythical founding flood occurred.”

Source: Legends say China began in a great flood. Scientists just found evidence that the flood was real. – The Washington Post

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“Animals as Weaponry” by Tonio Andrade

“Before guided missiles, humans had few ways to attack their enemies remotely, so they tried using animals. The Chinese were enthusiastic practitioners of this art.”

This is an interesting blog post on using animals as weapons: Tonio Andrade: Animals as Weaponry

“A New Look at Japan’s Wartime Atrocities and a U.S. Cover-Up” – The New York Times

“After the war, the United States covered up Japan’s biological warfare research on humans, allowing the perpetrators to escape punishment and to prosper.” Why? It “enabled the United States to gather information that was of great use for its own biological warfare program, early in the Cold War.” I don’t think that any potential benefit from these horrific experiments can justify covering up these crimes. And in the long run, it is against our own interests by undermining our moral standing in the world.  How we conduct ourselves around the world does have implications for our national security.

Read the entire article here: A New Look at Japan’s Wartime Atrocities and a U.S. Cover-Up – The New York Times

An exhibit at the Unit 731 museum depicts a frostbite experiment on prisoners.Credit Gilles Sabrie for The New York Times

“Why Xi Jinping’s Campaign to Suppress Western Ideas Is Bound to Fail” |History News Network

To remain in power the Chinese government must not only use the threat of punishment, it must also control what its citizens think and believe. In a battle of ideas the authoritarian regime would likely lose against the ideals of liberty, natural rights, and democracy.  Knowing this, the regime has resorted to cordoning itself off from the ocean of ideas that flow freely outside its borders.

But as Peter Zarrow points out, “Because the entire family of notions associated with democracy, liberty, and rights has become Chinese, they are ineradicable. Indeed, the very categories of ‘Western values’ and ‘universal values’ are incoherent in our thoroughly globalized world. Furthermore, since the 1980s, Chinese have gotten used to freedoms that include the choice of where to live and what job to take, much less whom to marry—a particular focus of New Youth concern—and attempts to barricade off a sacred party-state from the realm of personal freedoms will require ever greater resources.” A problem that will only get worse. Let’s hope their eventual frustrated attempts to retain power will not require significant bloodshed!

Read Zarrow’s entire essay here: History News Network | Why Xi Jinping’s Campaign to Suppress Western Ideas Is Bound to Fail

“Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House” – Yahoo News

In a five-thousand year old house in northeast China the remains of 97 people were found. Anthropologists believe that they were most likely victims of disease, but they don’t have enough evidence at this time to definitively determine the cause.

Read the fascinating story here:  Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House – Yahoo News.

hamin-mangha-remains

“China’s Invisible History: An Interview with Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie by Ian Johnson” | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books

This is an interesting interview with the Chinese artist and filmmaker Hu Jie. He has spent his life trying to preserve the memory of what happened in Maoist China through his art. Here’s an excerpt from the interview that is in reference to the picture below:

You also did a series called “We.” Some of these pictures are more hopeful. This one shows a child looking up.

It shows a street that Party leaders’ cars would drive down. Everyone has a bowed head but one child is looking up. In fact, I think all my work has hope in it. There is always someone who is not accepting the official story.”

China’s Invisible History: An Interview with Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie by Ian Johnson | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books.

Hu Jie: We #3, 2015

Hu Jie: We #3, 2015