“How Journalists Covered the Rise of Mussolini and Hitler” | History | Smithsonian

“Reports on the rise of fascism in Europe was not the American media’s finest hour.”

“Dorothy Thompson, who judged Hitler a man of ‘startling insignificance’ in 1928, realized her mistake by mid-decade when she, like Mowrer, began raising the alarm. ‘No people ever recognize their dictator in advance,’ she reflected in 1935. ‘He never stands for election on the platform of dictatorship. He always represents himself as the instrument [of] the Incorporated National Will.” Applying the lesson to the U.S., she wrote, ‘When our dictator turns up you can depend on it that he will be one of the boys, and he will stand for everything traditionally American.’”

Source: How Journalists Covered the Rise of Mussolini and Hitler | History | Smithsonian

“China’s Invisible History: An Interview with Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie by Ian Johnson” | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books

This is an interesting interview with the Chinese artist and filmmaker Hu Jie. He has spent his life trying to preserve the memory of what happened in Maoist China through his art. Here’s an excerpt from the interview that is in reference to the picture below:

You also did a series called “We.” Some of these pictures are more hopeful. This one shows a child looking up.

It shows a street that Party leaders’ cars would drive down. Everyone has a bowed head but one child is looking up. In fact, I think all my work has hope in it. There is always someone who is not accepting the official story.”

China’s Invisible History: An Interview with Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie by Ian Johnson | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books.

Hu Jie: We #3, 2015

Hu Jie: We #3, 2015