“Training for Neoliberalism” | Boston Review

In his review of Richard H. Thaler’s Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics, John McMahon takes to task behavioral economics for its complicity in propagating the neoliberal project (i.e. promoting limited government and free-market capitalism), rather than questioning its dehumanizing assumptions. “The implications of behavioral research are constantly constrained so that they actually buttress foundational assumptions about markets. Why? Thaler disavows the role of the ‘moral philosopher,’ refusing to ‘render judgment about what ‘is’ or ‘should be’ fair’, because economics is supposed to be a ‘purely descriptive exercise’—and thereby preempts interrogation of the fairness of the market itself.”

Read Thaler’s trenchant review here: Training for Neoliberalism | Boston Review.

The Making of Behavioral Economics misbehaving-web

“The Secret History of American Religion: Christian Fundamentalism Started As a Capitalist Ad Campaign” | Alternet

Timothy Gloege in Guaranteed Pure: The Moody Bible Institute, Business, and the Making of Modern Evangelicalism tells the story of Henry Parsons Crowell, the founder of Quaker Oats, and his role in the creation of modern fundamentalism. Gloege is not the first to point out that religion was enlisted in the service in capitalism beginning with the Gilded Age, but in telling a little known part of this story he enriches our understanding of this alliance. Daniel Silliman describes Gleoge’s book as a “fascinating narrative of the origins of modern evangelicalism.” Read Silliman’s interview with Gloge here:

The Secret History of American Religion: Christian Fundamentalism Started As a Capitalist Ad Campaign | Alternet.

Quaker Oats and Henry Parsons Crowell

Quaker Oats and Henry Parsons Crowell