“Justice Thomas Needs a Lesson in the History of the 2nd Amendment” | History News Network

“The overall point to be made is the Seventh Circuit did not relegate the Second Amendment to a “second-class right” as Justice Thomas claims. History refutes such a conclusion. The fact of the matter is the modern perception of the Second Amendment as guaranteeing broad firearm rights in both public and private is just that—modern.”

Source: History News Network | Justice Thomas Needs a Lesson in the History of the 2nd Amendment

A Historian’s Revealing Research on Race and Gun Laws – The Trace

“Saul Cornell is a leading authority on the history of U.S. gun regulations. Here’s how he views conservatives’ claims that gun control is racist.”

Very interesting: A Historian’s Revealing Research on Race and Gun Laws – The Trace

“Like Prohibition, the fight over guns is about something else” – LA Times

Jonathan Zimmerman puts forward an interesting claim about the fight over guns. He argues that it’s not about guns or “safety,” it’s about “victory.” Just as the prohibition movement wasn’t about drinking, Zimmerman asserts, the same holds true in the current fight over guns. “Even if alcohol prohibition could never make America ‘dry,’ it made its adherents feel as if the country was still theirs.”

While this surely plays a role in the battle over guns, I’m not convinced that it is not really about “safety,” at least for gun control advocates. There have been way too many gun-related deaths.

Read the entire article here: Like Prohibition, the fight over guns is about something else – LA Times

“How Gun Control Came to Britain” | History News Network

The historian Luke Reader offers hope for a path to gun control through the British example. He recognizes that in Britain “there has never been a domestic gun culture. Nor has there ever been a right to bear arms [there hasn’t been here either until the Supreme Court declared (falsely) that the Second Amendment protects an individual right to bear arms],” but he points out that it’s possible to change the momentum in favor of gun control through popular movements.
He’s right. Even if it looks bleak at the moment, we have to keep trying. We majority of Americans support gun control. So we have the power to defeat the NRA; what we’re missing is the will.

Read the entire article here: History News Network | How Gun Control Came to Britain

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“What We’ve Overlooked in the Debate About Charleston: The Connection between Guns and Racism” | History News Network

It is common knowledge that American’s have a short historical memory, but some of that forgetting is politically expedient as well. This is certainly the case when it comes the history of guns in the South. Therefore, it is significant that Robert McWhirter reminds us of this important history: “We associate the American south with guns and consider it the most anti-gun control part of the nation. In reality it was always the most gun controlled. From before the American Revolution until the well after the Civil War slaves couldn’t touch a gun without the master’s permission.  Laws prohibited even free blacks from having a gun, a situation that persisted throughout the Jim Crow south well into the twentieth century.  This was strict gun control.”

Read the entire piece here:

History News Network | What We’ve Overlooked in the Debate About Charleston: The Connection between Guns and Racism.

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“Guns Were Much More Strictly Regulated in the 1920s and 1930s than They Are Today” | History News Network

Robert J. Spitzer gives a brief overview of gun regulation in the 1920s and 1930s, and concludes that “guns were much more strictly regulated decades or even centuries ago than they are today.” This is a pretty narrow slice of gun control history on which to base such a broad conclusion, but looking at the “Table of Contents” from his book (Guns Across America) it looks like Spitzer’s conclusion is grounded in a much broader history of gun control from the founding to today.
Despite its brevity, Spitzer’s summary of gun control in the 1920s and 1930s is very interesting. To read his summary go here:

History News Network | Guns Were Much More Strictly Regulated in the 1920s and 1930s than They Are Today.

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